#EUCitizens – How satisfied are people with their lives?

| November 8, 2019 | 0 Comments

By EU Reporter Correspondent

“Overall, how satisfied are you with your life these days?� people across the European Union (EU) were asked. Life satisfaction represents how a respondent evaluates his or her life taken as a whole. On a scale from 0 (“not satisfied at all�) to 10 (“fully satisfied�), the mean (average) life satisfaction of EU residents aged 16 and over was 7.3 in 2018, an increase compared with 7.0 in 2013.

Since 2013, the mean level of satisfaction with the financial situation of their own household in the EU also increased, from 6.0 in 2013 to 6.5 in 2018, whilst the mean satisfaction with personal relations remained nearly stable, 7.8 in 2013 and 7.9 in 2018. Eurostat, the statistical office of the European Union, publishes a selection of subjective indicators on wellbeing of people in Europe. A detailed article is available on the Eurostat website.

Highest life satisfaction in Finland and Austria, lowest in Bulgaria In 2018, the mean life satisfaction, measured on a scale of 0 to 10, varied significantly between EU member states. With an overall average of 8.1, inhabitants of Finland were the most satisfied with their lives in the EU, closely followed by those in Austria (8.0), Denmark, Poland and Sweden (all 7.8). At the opposite end of the scale, residents in Bulgaria (5.4) were by far the least satisfied, followed by those in Croatia (6.3), Greece and Lithuania (both 6.4), Hungary (6.5), Latvia and Portugal (both 6.7).

Among member states for which 2018 data are available, the mean life satisfaction increased since 2013 in 19 Member States. The highest increase was recorded in Cyprus (from 6.2 in 2013 to 7.1 in 2018, or +0.9), Bulgaria (+0.6), Czechia, Estonia, Poland and Portugal (all +0.5). Compared with 2013, the mean life satisfaction remained unchanged in two member states: Belgium and Croatia. In contrast, a decrease was recorded in four member states: Lithuania (from 6.7 in 2013 to 6.4 in 2018, or -0.3), Denmark (-0.2), and to a lower extent in the Netherlands and Sweden (both -0.1).

Mean satisfaction with the financial situation of the household varied significantly between EU member states. With an average of 7.6, inhabitants of Denmark, Finland and Sweden were the most satisfied with the household financial situation. They were followed by those in the Netherlands (7.4), Austria (7.3), Belgium (7.0), Luxembourg (6.9), Germany and Malta (both 6.8). At the opposite end of the scale, residents in Bulgaria (4.3) were by far the least satisfied, followed by those in Greece, Croatia and Lithuania (all 5.2), Latvia and Portugal (both 5.4), and Hungary (5.5).

In nearly all member states for which 2018 data are available, the mean satisfaction with the financial situation increased compared with 2013, with the exception of Denmark, Luxembourg and the Netherlands where it remained unchanged, and Lithuania where it decreased from 5.8 in 2013 to 5.2 in 2018 (-0.6). The highest increases were recorded in Greece, Cyprus and Portugal (+0.9), Malta (+0.8), Czechia, Italy and Slovenia (all +0.7). Highest satisfaction with personal relationships in Malta, Austria and Slovenia In 2018, the mean satisfaction with personal relationships varied significantly between EU member states. With an overall average of 8.6, inhabitants of Malta, Austria and Slovenia were the most satisfied with their personal relationships in the EU. They were followed by those in Cyprus and Sweden (both 8.5), Finland (8.4) and Czechia (8.3). At the opposite end of the scale, residents in Bulgaria (6.6) followed by those in Greece (7.1), Croatia (7.5), Italy, Hungary and Romania (all 7.6) were the least satisfied.

Among member states for which 2018 data are available, the mean satisfaction with personal relationships increased since 2013 in 18 member states. The highest increases were recorded in Bulgaria (from 5.7 in 2013 to 6.6 in 2018, or +0.9), Cyprus (+0.5), Spain (+0.4), Estonia, Italy, Portugal and Slovenia (all +0.3). Compared with 2013, the mean satisfaction with personal relationships remained unchanged in two member states: Hungary and Romania, while a decrease was recorded in five member states: Denmark, Latvia and the Netherlands (all -0.3), Lithuania and Luxembourg (both -0.2). Geographical information The European Union (EU) includes Belgium, Bulgaria, Czechia, Denmark, Germany, Estonia, Ireland, Greece, Spain, France, Croatia, Italy, Cyprus, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Hungary, Malta, the Netherlands, Austria, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovenia, Slovakia, Finland, Sweden and the United Kingdom.

Methods and definitions Data on the subjective well-being presented are based on the EUstatistics on the 2018 ad-hoc module, which is part of the European Union’s Survey on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC). The EU-SILC survey is the EU reference source for comparative statistics on income distribution, poverty and living conditions. The 2018 module covered some of the variables, which were previously collected for the 2013 ad-hoc module on the same subject. The reference population is all private households and their current members residing in the territory of a given Member State at the time of data collection.

Persons living in collective households and in institutions are generally excluded from the target population as well as small and remote parts of the national territory amounting to no more than 2% of the national population. The measurement of life satisfaction is intended to cover a broad appraisal the respondent makes of his or her life. The term “life� is intended here as all areas of a person’s existence. The variable therefore refers to the respondent’s opinion/feeling about the degree of satisfaction with his/her life. The survey covered the population aged 16 and over. It is measured on an 11 point scale which ranges from 0 (“not satisfied at all�) to 10 (“fully satisfied�).

Source:: EU Reporter Feed

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