Russian Historian Oleg Kuznetsov reiterates Umberto Eco’s warning about the Nazi threat

| September 15, 2020 | 0 Comments

By EU Reporter Correspondent

Each of our readers, regardless of their nationality, political views, or religious beliefs, retains a part of the 20th-century pain in their soul. Pain and memory of those who died in the fight against Nazism. The history of the Nazi regimes of the last century, from Hitler to Pinochet, indisputably proves that the path to Nazism taken by any country has common features. Anyone who, under the guise of preserving the history of their country, rewrites or hides the true facts, does nothing but drag own people into the abyss while imposing this aggressive policy on neighboring states and the entire world. In 1995, Umberto Eco, one of the most globally famous writers and author of such best-selling books as Foucault’s Pendulum and The Name of the Rose, took part in a Symposium held by the Italian and French Departments of Columbia University in New York (on the day when the anniversary of the liberation of Europe from Nazism is celebrated). Eco addressed the audience with his essay Eternal Fascism that contained a warning to the entire world about the fact that the threat of fascism and Nazism persists even after the end of World War II. The definitions coined by Eco differ from the classical definitions of both fascism and Nazism. One should not look for clear parallels in his formulations or point out possible coincidences; his approach is quite special and speaks rather about the psychological features of a certain ideology that he labelled ‘eternal fascism.’ In his message to the world, the writer says that fascism begins neither with the Blackshirts’ brave marches, nor with the destruction of dissenters, nor with wars and concentration camps, but with a very specific worldview and attitude of people, with their cultural habits, dark instincts and unconscious impulses. They are the true source of the tragic events that shake countries and entire continents.
Many writers still resort to this topic in their journalistic and literary works, while often forgetting that, in this case, artistic fiction is inappropriate, and sometimes criminal. Published in Russia, the book State Policy of Glorification of Nazism in Armenia by military historian Oleg Kuznetsov reiterates Umberto Eco’s words: “We need an enemy to give people hope. Someone said that patriotism is the last refuge of cowards; those without moral principles usually wrap a flag around themselves, and the bastards always talk about the purity of the race. National identity is the last bastion of the dispossessed. But the meaning of identity is now based on hatred, on hatred for those who are not the same. Hatred has to be cultivated as a civic passion.â€�
Umberto Eco knew firsthand what fascism was, since he grew up under Mussolini’s dictatorship. Born in Russia, Oleg Kuznetsov, just like almost every person of his age, developed his attitude to Nazism based not on publications and films, but primarily on the testimonies of eyewitnesses who survived in World War II. Not being a politician but speaking on behalf of ordinary Russian people, Kuznetsov begins his book with the words the leader of his home country said on May 9, 2019, on the day when victory over fascism is celebrated:

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